Oh god….another feedback round.

Image created with Midjourney

Design approvals from multiple stakeholders (regulatory, marketing, client, printer, CMO) can be a challenging and time-consuming task for artwork managers and design teams. It’s like trying to herd cats – it’s impossible, but you still have to try! In today’s heavy workloads, it’s important to streamline the design approval process and save time, reduce delays and ensure projects are completed on time and with as few rounds as possible. What are the 2 key challenges of getting approval rounds right?

Challenge 1: Managing Multiple (often too many) Feedback Loops

When working with multiple stakeholders, there’s always the risk of conflicting opinions, which can result in endless rounds of revisions and delay the project. Quality might ask to add one end of sentence dot, Regulatory wants to skip it to launch the product, Marketing is changing the color of the flap….again, while the printer realised they attached the wrong dieline. OMG moment. To overcome this, it’s important to establish clear lines of communication and a structured review process. This includes setting up regular check-ins, clear expectations and deadlines, and establishing a centralized system for feedback and revisions.

Challenge 2: Balancing Speed and Quality

Another key challenge in managing design approvals is balancing speed and quality. In order to ensure that projects are completed on time, it’s often necessary to move quickly through the design approval process. However, this can result in missed details, oversights, or incorrect approvals. On the other hand, taking too much time to review and approve can be costly or simply unacceptable. To balance speed and quality, it’s important to set realistic deadlines, involve the right people at the right time, and establish a clear and consistent review process.

Bonus Quiz: Serial or Parallel Approvals?

One key component of a proper approval process is the establishment of approval model. This is in many oranizations overlooked and underrated. Let me explain.

The Serial Approval Process

Image with Midjourney

When multiple stakeholders are required to provide feedback and approval, it is common practice to request such approval one stakeholder at a time. The argument that we typically hear is that this allows the design team to fix errors early on before the “important” stakeholders take a look. Every time we face this, it hurts. Intermediate and uncompleted feedback rounds only cause MORE WORK, not less. They also increase the risk of introducing unwanted mistakes.

The Parallel Approval Process

An alternative approach is to request feedback and approval to all stakeholders at the same time, and wait for all responses before issuing a new version. This comes with its own challenges is hardly suited for a traditional email/paper based model.

Golden Tip: Implement an Automated Approval Workflow

To improve and simplify the design approval process, it’s recommended to implement an automated approval workflow. Automated workflows can help streamline the review and approval process, reducing the time it takes to complete designs and minimizing the risk of missed details or oversights. With an automated system, all feedback and revisions are stored in one central location, allowing teams to track the status of each design in real-time. This suits the Parallel Approval Process really neatly and helps to keep the process organized, reduces the risk of conflicting feedback, and ensures everyone is on the same page. It’s like having a GPS for your design approvals – you’ll always know where you’re going and how to get there!

Managing approvals can be a complex and time-consuming process. But, with the right approach, it can be a straightforward and efficient process. By establishing clear lines of communication, balancing speed and quality, and implementing an automated approval workflow, organizations can streamline the design approval process, save time and ensure projects are completed on time and with a few iterations as possible. And, most importantly, they can have a little more peace of mind and a little less stress.

The nightmare of technical specs

Image created with Midjourney

Working in the pharmaceutical industry, the creation of packaging designs can be a challenging and complex process, especially when dealing with multiple Contract Manufacturing Organizations (CMOs) and Printing companies. There are many factors that can impact the design, including regulatory requirements, branding, marketing, and of course, technical considerations. One of the biggest challenges that packaging designers face when working with multiple printing stakeholders (weather it is a CMO or a printer directly) is the varying technical requirements. Different companies have different machinery and different Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) (sometimes they don’t even have SOPs).

Oh man…this is hard.

The first challenge related to working with multiple printers is the differences in print and packing capabilities. Each printer may have different printing processes and equipment that they use. For example, one printer may use a rotogravure printing process while another may use flexographic printing. This can result in differences in color accuracy, registration, and overall quality of the final print. Additionally, some printers may not be able to accommodate certain design elements, such as holographic foils or raised printing, which can impact the design and the overall look of the packaging. Additionally, and more specifically for the packaging industry, the printed materials are going to be the input of a packing machine which is going to fold, fill, glue and whatnot in an automated machine. This process is critical since failure can have a high cost impact. Most “reasonable” printing companies and CMOs provide technical specifications to their design agencies (or their clients) so the design materials can be created to specs.

The second challenge is the complex technical documentation that designers must understand in order to create compliant designs. Technical documentation often includes specifications on dielines, varnish free areas, margins, folding lines, visual marks used for automated packing and many more. Understanding these guidelines and ensuring that the design meets them can be a time-consuming and confusing process, particularly for designers who are not familiar with the specific requirements of each printer and considering some of these technical specification documents can be 40 page long. If you are dealing with 10 suppliers, times 40 is a 400 page documentation. That is not easy to manage. This can result in mistakes and miscommunications between the design team and the printer, which can ultimately impact the time to market.

What can we do to fix this?

There are ways to improve the process when technical specification documentation is complex and there are many different suppliers:

  1. Write and maintain proper design manuals specifically for each printer/CMO. This will help ensure that the design team has all of the information they need to create designs that are compatible with each printer’s technical requirements. This can also help avoid misunderstandings and miscommunications between the design team and the printer. Additionally, it will be required should you have to face a customer audit.
  2. Perform training of the design team on all technical requirements. This will help ensure that the design team is aware of the specific requirements of each printer and can create designs that are compatible with those requirements. Furthermore, it will help designers find and interpret information faster and accurately.
  3. Allow a direct line of communication with the printer instead of via the client. A direct line of communication can help avoid misunderstandings and miscommunications that may occur when the design team is communicating through the client. Let the technical people speak to technical people directly, otherwise you will face the broken phone syndrome.

The creation of packaging designs can be challenging, especially when working with multiple CMOs and printers. The varying technical requirements of each printer and the long and complex technical documentation can be a pain in the arse to deal with and a high risk factor. But don’t despair, by following these three tips – writing and maintaining proper design manuals, performing training on technical requirements, and allowing a direct line of communication with the printer – designers can improve the process and ensure that the final product meets all of the necessary requirements.

Send this to your (design) clients

Design briefs are essential for creative projects as they help set clear expectations and define the scope of work. However, working with a design brief that has missing (or useless) information such as low-quality images can be a significant challenge. Below you will find the key challenges faced when working with an incomplete design brief and obtain tips on how to create a clear and comprehensive brief.

You must read this if you are a customer

Every designer in the world

The classical challenges

One of the major challenges of working with a design brief that has missing information is the lack of clear guidelines. This often leads to confusion and misinterpretation, resulting in a final product that does not meet the client’s expectations. For example, if the brief does not include all the reference files or text documents, the designer may struggle to understand the client’s request and produce an artwork that is not in line with their requirements.

Another common mistake is the use of low-quality (or low-resolution) images. When the final design needs to be printed, such as packaging materials for like…..everything that is sold, the images provided to the design team need to have sufficient resolution for the required printing size and method (SPOT and Digital Printing can be different). This not only affects the quality of the final product but also the reputation of the designer and the company they work for. Although, in all likelihood, your designer will probably have to reject the job and ask for better images.

5 things you need to do as a customer

It is of the outmost importance to create a clear and comprehensive design brief that includes all relevant information. Here are five tips to help make the brief clear:

  1. Include clear brief information: The brief should include a clear and concise description of the project’s goals, technical specifications and in general the desired outcome. This will help the designer understand the client’s vision and ensure that they are on the same page. Do not make it more difficult that it needs to be….more is not always better.
  2. Add up-to-scale dielines: Dielines are essential for product design, as they provide a template for the designer to follow when creating the final product. This is particularly critical for packaging materials since it will most likely be the input of a packaging machine when mistakes can be very costly. By including up-to-scale, clean and usable dielines in the brief, the designer can ensure that the final product will meet the client’s technical specifications. If you think a blurry scan of a dieline is good enough…..think again.
  3. Include all text documents: The brief should include all text documents that are relevant to the project, such as product descriptions, marketing materials, regulatory texts, and any other content that will be used in the final product. The designers cannot read your mind, they cannot possibly know all the details of the regulatory bodies of the many countries where you are releasing and have no insight on your company’s strategies. Don’t make it difficult, make it nice. If a text needs to be included, please add a readable document that can be copy-pasted (designers do not type).
  4. Add clear and precise annotations: Sometimes the best way to convey an idea is by annotating an existing document indicating any specific requirements or requests that the client has. Be like water, be clear.
  5. Include all relevant references of essential information: The brief should include references to any essential information that the client feels is important, such as brand guidelines or examples of similar products. If it takes time to find those documents, better do it before hand.

Working with an incomplete design brief can be a significant challenge for designers, but with the right tools and tips, it can be overcome. Remember, too much information is just as bad as too little information, so be sure to strike the right balance and keep the brief concise, yet comprehensive. And always remember, a good design brief is like a GPS – it helps you reach your destination with ease!

On-premises vs SaaS

Even though the corporate solutions landscape has rapidly evolved over the last decade, the decision between an on-premises software installation and a SaaS cloud solution is a common one that many organizations face. There are several key differences between the two that impact cost, functionality, and security.

  1. Cost: On-premises software requires a significant upfront investment in hardware, maintenance, and upgrades. It also requires the in-house expertise in the form of developers, engineers, infrastructure and security experts. In contrast, a SaaS solution is generally sold as a subscription service and eliminates the need for a large upfront investment. This means that the cost of a SaaS solution is more predictable and often more manageable.
  2. Functionality: On-premises software offers more customization options, but it also requires more expertise to set up and manage. Development and installation takes a significant amount of time as the complexity of the required functions increases, taking several months to years to setup a system. A SaaS solution, on the other hand, is managed by the vendor. It typically offers less customization but is easier to set up and use. If the SaaS solution offers a powerful API, customization can be further extended. This can lead to a more streamlined and efficient process with a significantly lower go-live time.
  3. Security: On-premises software is often perceived as more secure because the data is stored on the organization’s own servers. However it also requires more resources and expertise to manage and protect. A SaaS solution is managed by the vendor and typically offers a higher level of security than an on-premises solution, specially when large scale, well know infrastructure providers are used, such as Amazon. It also involves more trust in the vendor and their security practices, which is typically solved with Information Security audits.

In conclusion, when deciding between an on-premises software installation and a SaaS cloud solution, it’s important to consider the cost, functionality, and security implications of each option. While on-premises software offers more customization options, it also requires more resources and expertise to set up and manage. SaaS solutions are easier to use and offer more predictable costs, but they also involve more trust in the vendor and their security practices. Ultimately, the right solution will depend on the specific needs and resources of each organization, but let’s be honest. Who in its right mind would in 2023 decide to purchase an on-premises solution when there are SaaS alternatives on the market?

How many reminders have you sent today?

Image created with Midjourney

Collecting feedback on packaging design from multiple stakeholders can be a frustrating and time-consuming process, especially when relying on traditional methods such as email. Not only does it require constant back-and-forth communication, but it also makes it difficult to keep track of comments and revisions from different parties. And let’s not talk about “you know who”, who always needs a few reminders to send the feedback and is almost always late.

One of the biggest challenges in this process is getting feedback from printers, regulatory bodies, marketing teams, contract manufacturers, and clients. Each of these groups has their own specific concerns and requirements that need to be addressed, and coordinating their input can be a logistical nightmare.

Printers will have concerns about the technical aspects of the design, such as file keylines or barcodes, while regulatory teams will need to ensure that the packaging complies with all relevant laws and standards and includes the approved text. Marketing teams will want to ensure that the design follows the “somewhat” strict brand guidelines, while contract manufacturers will need to ensure that the design is suitable for their machinery. And of course, if you are dealing with clients will have their own unique requirements and preferences.

All of these different perspectives and requirements can make the feedback process overwhelming, and it can be difficult to keep track of who has provided what feedback and what revisions have been made. This can lead to delays, miscommunication and increased costs. And….yeah, I won’t mention the fearful recall.

Thankfully, there is a solution to this problem: an approval management system such as the one provided by Twona. This system streamlines the feedback process by providing a central platform for all stakeholders (also external stakeholders to your organization) to collaborate and provide feedback on the design. It eliminates the need for constant back-and-forth communication via email and makes it easy to keep track of comments and revisions (with very strict version control).

With Twona’s approval management system, all stakeholders can easily view the design and provide feedback in real-time. This speeds up the approval process and ensures that all comments and revisions are captured in one place. Additionally, the system allows for easy communication between stakeholders and makes it easy to see which feedback has been addressed and which still needs to be acted upon.

If you’re tired of the frustration and inefficiency of the traditional feedback process and wish you were on the beach instead of sending emails reminding people to do their jobs, contact our sales team today to schedule a demo of Twona’s approval management system. See for yourself how it can make a difference to your packaging design process and improve your bottom line.

The failed digitalization

image of a digital word, click of a button and multiple devices. Photo from canva.com
Digitalization of processes can be a difficult task. Here are some strategies to make it a bit easier. Photo: canva.com

Are you transforming your company processes into digital ones? These are a few things to consider when doing so to make sure your team is on board!

The digitalization of company processes can be a challenging transition for employees who have been doing the same thing for a long time. This is because it requires them to adapt to new technology and ways of working, which can be overwhelming and intimidating. Additionally, some employees may feel that their job is being replaced by a system, leading to fear of job loss and uncertainty about their future.

However, with the right strategies in place, companies can help their employees to embrace the digitalization process and make the transition as smooth as possible.

  • One strategy for helping employees to embrace digitalization is to provide them with training and resources. This can include training on the new technology and processes, as well as access to online resources such as tutorials and FAQs. Providing employees with a clear understanding of how the new technology works and how it will benefit them and the company can help to alleviate their fears and uncertainty. Additionally, providing employees with the opportunity to test out the new technology in a controlled environment can help to build their confidence and familiarity with it.
  • Another strategy is to involve employees in the transition process. This can include involving them in the selection and implementation of the new technology and processes. By giving employees a sense of ownership and control over the process, they are more likely to be invested in its success and feel more positive about the changes. By involving employees in the process, companies can also benefit from their expertise and knowledge of the current processes, which can help to identify potential issues and improve the efficiency of the new technology.
  • Communication is also key when it comes to helping employees to embrace digitalization. Keeping employees informed of the reasons for the change, the benefits it will bring and the progress made during the process, can help to reduce anxiety and uncertainty. Regular updates and opportunities for feedback can also help to address any concerns employees may have and ensure that the digitalisation process is as smooth as possible.
  • Finally, companies can also help their employees to embrace digitalization by providing them with career development opportunities. This can include training and development programs to help them acquire new skills and knowledge that will be relevant to the new technology and processes. This, in turn, can help to keep employees engaged and motivated, and provide a sense of purpose and direction during the transition.

We have helped many companies make the transition to our SaaS Artwork Management System, and have experience this reticence to change the old ways from employees. “We have always done it like this” is not really a reason to not move forward! Some companies deal with it better than others, but the above strategies are in the core of all successful implementations we have done where some resistance was shown by one or several members of the team.

We are proud to say that many of those change-adverse people who were not happy at that moment in time have turned to become our best advocates for the use of Twona.

Rafael Cruz Núñez
Artwork Manager

Simplifying approvals is possible

Releasing a new product at a specific time can be very important for the results,the time factor will always be something to consider. If we are dealing with a deviation that implies a withdrawal from the market, speeding up the changes will be even more critical and always with several departments involved.

The approvals of our packaging materials have been traditionally managed via email in two different ways:

  • Serial process: in sequence you ask for feedback to different stakeholders and when one material is approved the next step can begin consecutively.
  • Parallel process: we ask for feedback to different stakeholders in different departments at the same time.
Photo by Twona

When we talk about approvals there are usually at least 3 departments involved, for example regulatory affairs, marketing, quality or your technical colleagues. As many people we need feedback from,the more difficult the email process becomes.

It is not impossible, but it certainly takes a lot more effort to find, trace and control the process, not to mention the increased probability of errors and the delay it can cause.

How does your company manage approvals among departments? What about when there are external stakeholders involved in the process like a printer?

This is how we handle approvals within our artwork management software (AMS), Twona:

Photo by Twona
  1. Select the file: we select in our system the file from which we need feedback from. The file with unique identifier associated with a single project:
  2. Fill in the form: where we specify the permissions that you can see below, the subject, the recipients and we include our comments to give it context.
  3. Receive email: stakeholders, within our organisation or external users, will receive an email to access the approval screen and give their feedback.
  4. Review file (s): here we can leave comments in the text field or leave sticky notes in the file itself, we can also add files if necessary as well as give our approval or rejection eventually.
  5. Control approvals: in Twona (AMS) there is a direct access in the upper menu to the approvals with the necessary indications to know the status of the process.

Photo by Twona

Once you work this way, there comes a time when you wonder how you were able to manage so many approvals without making mistakes.

Photo by Twona

This is how we manage the packaging materials together with the comparisons tool (X-RAY) and everything offered by the artwork management software, Twona, but that’s another story.

I wonder how you resolve this process today and I invite you to leave us your comments.

Do you miss any relevant information or step for your approvals?

Top 3 Compliance Risks Involving Packaging (and How to Prevent Them)

Photo by Meriç Dağlı

The packaging world shakes hands with a plethora of different industries; Pharmaceutical, Fast Moving Consumer Goods, Food & Beverage, Cosmetics, etc. Each industry has its own unique working environment, including unique hazards that come with each. But any industry that deals with packaging shares some overlapping risks. Here are the top three compliance risks for packaging, and one potential solution that can take them all on.

The Three Monsters:

1. Recalls

Anyone involved in the packaging world knows the dreaded word “recall.” Some have had the misfortune of dealing with this problem head on, and others have only heard through the grapevine about the steep consequences that must be faced when dealing with a recall.

A recall is peculiar in that one seemingly microscopic misprint can make the difference between a successfully launched product and millions of dollars worth of logistics rollback and untold damage to quality and reputation. The consequences of recalls have short term immediate impact as well as long term ramifications, such as sanctions.

2. Process Risks

A process risk, while often less blunt than a recall, can have more subtle and extended impact, which makes them more dangerous in that they are easier to overlook. Process risks involve a failure to follow established processes. In the packaging world, an example of this could be as simple as skipping a step in the validation process for the design of a new pamphlet.

Photo by UX Indonesia

process with postits
Photo by UX Indonesia

When process risks become habitual the potential for heavier risks (such as recalls) increases, productivity can decline, and the quality of output can suffer, overtime causing damage to the bottom lineand more importantly to the vital structures that keep companies afloat.

3. Illegal Practices

The risk of illegal practices is in many ways self explanatory. Everyone would like to believe that their company is immune to such risk, but illegal practices are not exclusively intentional. More often than not illegal practices take place unknowingly and are a result of the mismanagement of processes or resources.

In terms of packaging, unintentional illegal practices can take the shape of mislabelling, mismanagement, and nonobservance of legal requirements.

What causes these risks?

While there are varying factors that enhance the probability of the risks above, it is clear that the three risks share some common threads. Miscommunication is a likely cause in many errors attributed to recalls, process risks, or illegal mishaps, and can be an ill-fated result of disorganization with an individual or team, lack of transparency for the proper parties, or workflow inconsistenciesTime Pressure is another phenomenon that those involved in packaging design are intimately familiar with. The rush to get to the shelf can often mean that safekeeping processes are overlooked and corners are cut to decrease the amount of time it takes to start seeing a return on investment.

Photo by Kenny Eliason

Photo of a sand clock
Photo by Kenny Eliason

Completely eliminating these risks may not be possible, but companies can create some mitigation strategies to lower the probability of these occurrences.

One Solution to Rule Them All – Online Artwork Management Tools

While the root causes of compliance risks may seem intimidating at a glance, the good news is that these issues can be prevented with proper support. In today’s technological age there is a wide range of Artwork Management Systems (AMS) that boost communication efficiency and workflow organization through a plethora of verification, workflow management, and proofing tools. By using an AMS, companies are able to support the artwork design process by eliminating old manual processes and lengthy back and forth email exchanges with different parties.

But what really makes an AMS so interesting for organizations? You can find some of the well-known benefits below.

Organize communication and create one source of truth

  • Create one centralized artwork repository containing all versions, which is accessible at any time.
  • Eliminate back and forth email exchanges and communicate about the project within the project itself.
  • Allow for internal and external feedback and approvals, tracking status, comments and confirmations to be accessed in one single place.
  • Record full audit trails of what happens with the project from briefing to print.

Increase workflow visibility

  • Identify & eliminate bottlenecks in your workflow process, see where improvements are needed most.
  • Track KPIs & gain actionable insights, visualize your workflow and prevent process errors.

Streamline approvals

  • Share files of any size, no more inbox limits.
  • Request feedback approvals from internal and external stakeholders on the right version.
  • Return annotated files and attach new ones for changing purposes.
  • Visualize all approvals from one single place.

Give you the power of proofing

  • Gain a clear view of changes in packaging done through different versions (text & graphic) and reduce the need to inspect manually.
  • Red line overlapping documents and also x-ray side by-side comparisons.
  • Download proofing reports.
  • Comment directly on documents, where multi-user notes combine together.

Automate and integrate to eliminate redundant tasks

  • Set automatic notifications.
  • Integrate with other tools to speed up processes.

Do the reasons above sound like something that would make your process easier, and give you the peace of mind that your company requires? If the answer is yes, you may be a good fit for an AMS.

Photo by Twona

Compliance Risks are Nothing to Fear

Compliance risks are an ever present obstacle that anyone in the packaging industry must stay vigilant against. But that doesn’t mean that they are insurmountable. With proper workflow transparency and consistency, compliance risks are easily mitigated. If you’re ever in fear, you can depend on AMS and other solutions to save the day.

Published by Twona: Twona is a multi-faceted packaging specialist company with 20 years of experience in software solutions and packaging design. Twona’s flagship product Twona AMS has helped companies worldwide organize and streamline their packaging design process. You can start a free trial of Twona AMS today by clicking the following link , or request a demo now.

System Connectivity – inspiration to manage your Artworks

Photo by Stefano Bucciarelli

Nowadays we have tools that help us manage our Artworks. The two major ones being:

  • Artwork Manager – guarantees the correct identification of our Artworks, avoiding duplicity, and respecting fundamental rules for the industry (Good Manufacturing Practice (#GMP) , offers a unique identifier, traceability, archive of all files, … amongst others
  • Quality tool that allows us to review the final product through comparison. These comparisons can be at the graphical level between two artwork versions, or review of a text with the design, i.e. content check.

Both tools have evolved over time to improve and cover all possible use cases and maximize processes on a tool level. The next step would be to talk about #connectivity at a few levels:

Photo by Clint Adair
  • Connectivity with external parties – allow third parties (e.g providers, printing companies, clients) to interact with our tools. An example is an #approvals system where we ask for feedback about a specific Artwork. External users can approve/reject these and leave their comments and attach files, completing the review process.
  • Connectivity amongst the different tools we use, a.k.a #integration. This is controlled through automation platforms, from a wide range of programs, which we can make “talk to each other” to generate a specific action. The possibilities are countless, some examples of this potential are: automate your inbox; administer a project; Artchive and make security copies of work ; notifications and alerts; monitoring ; client support; reports, graphics and control panels; web design; accounting and invoicing;

If your current system is isolated from the external world, or you think integration of your applications is possible, this is the time to change your AMS and open your eyes to the sea of possibilities that integration platforms have to offer.

Rafael Cruz Núñez
Artwork Manager

Kaizen 改 (kai -change) 善 (zen- for the better)

Photo by Connor Ludy - Japanese signs on orange background
Photo by Conor Luddy

Kaizen is no new concept, it is quite an old concept well renowned in the industry, in relation to quality management.

Most sectors nowadays must adapt quickly to a changing environment, in a nearly organic manner. There is that resistance to change nearly inherent to human beings. Once we are used to something, and we are agile in a specific process, it takes a while for us to amold to a change that means learning a new technology, forgetting or unlearning the previous process.

Considering that a new adjustment or process would be beneficial, could it be that adding a new process would be what causes the initial friction?

Photo by Elisa Ventur

How many of the changes you experienced in the last year meant learning to use a new tool or software?

There are possibly workers that can manage their jobs with 2 or 3 tools, buy I would dare to say that most of us use at least 5 or 6. Is that too much? Without too many details, I can count: Task and team manager + internal communication tool + online cloud storage + CRM + ERP + Invoicing system ; Shared document editor + Wiki + Password manager + Video conferencing system + Email + Time tracker + Process automation and workflow management…

So, just working with half of these tools is quite a lot to use on a daily basis, each team would have their own tools to manage and control their processes in the best way possible. Does it mean that we have enough and we cannot absorb any more tool-related changes? I do not have an answer to that but I do not think that is the best approach to the matter. It is, however, the time to reflect on how the process can be simplified, which is why I am taking on the automation of processes or integrations.

Photo by Mathew Schwart

In that search for continuous improvement through change, it could be that we have become obsessed with wanting to use the best tool for everything – the most complete CRM, with a task manager and teams easy and usable; tools to communicate; intuitive invoicing system; and organized resources planning to link operations in different areas, ERP.

Do not get me wrong. Of course, we all want the best for our teams, and we want to provide the best in market tool for each process. But, sometimes, when we study processes from a top perspective, looking at the big picture, maybe the answer is in learning the connection between different tasks to create a sequence and automate as much as possible.

Is tool integration the new Kaizen of our time?

Rafael Cruz Núñez
Artwork Manager